Fire Protection Systems

fire-protection-services

DIV Security design and install fire alarm and detection systems for all commercial and domestic applications. All systems are professionals installed using fire resistant cable to meet the relevant British standards in regards to fire alarm.
We provide fire alarm installation, maintenance, repair services. All of our systems fully comply with BS5839 standards. Fire alarm monitoring service also available. To book your fire alarm survey fill out a Contact Us form, or call us on 0203 384 7452.

What is an automatic fire alarm?

An automatic fire alarm system is a set of electric/electronic devices/equipment working together to detect and alert people through visual and audible appliances when smoke/fire is present. These alarms may be activated from smoke detectors, heat detectors, water flow sensors, which are automatic or from a manual fire alarm call point.

Fire alarm installation, fire alarm upgrades

BS 5839-1 defines eight categories of system, according to whether the system is purely manual or incorporates automatic fire detection, and, in the latter case, the purpose and extent of the automatic fire detection.

 What is Fire alarm or Fire protection system?

An automatic fire alarm system is designed to detect the unwanted presence of fire by monitoring environmental changes associated with combustion. In general, a fire alarm system is either classified as automatic, manually activated, or both. Automatic fire alarm systems can be used to notify people to evacuate in the event of a fire or other emergency, to summon emergency services, and to prepare the structure and associated systems to control the spread of fire and smoke.

 
Fundamental configuration
  • Fire alarm control panel: This component, the hub of the system, monitors inputs and system integrity, control outputs and relays information.
  • Primary Power supply: Commonly the non-switched 120 or 240 V AC source supplied from a commercial power utility. In non-residential applications, a branch circuit is dedicated to the fire alarm system and its constituents. “Dedicated branch circuits” should not be confused with “Individual branch circuits” which supply energy to a single appliance.
  • Secondary (backup) Power supplies: This component, commonly consisting of sealed lead-acid storage batteries or other emergency sources including generators, is used to supply energy in the event of a primary power failure.
  • Initiating Devices: This component acts as input to the fire alarm control unit and are either manually or automatically activated.
  • Notification appliances: This component uses energy supplied from the fire alarm system or other stored energy source, to inform the proximate persons of the need to take action, usually to evacuate.
  • Building Safety Interfaces: This interface allows the fire alarm system to control aspects of the built environment and to prepare the building for fire and to control the spread of smoke fumes and fire by influencing air movement, lighting, process control, human transport and exit.

Initiating devices

  • Manually activated devices; Break glass stations, Buttons and manual call points are constructed to be readily located (near the exits), identified, and operated.
  • heat detector, products of combustion; smoke detector, radiant energy; flame detector, combustion gasses; carbon monoxide detector and release of extinguishing agents; water-flow detector. The newest innovations can use cameras and computer algorithms to analyse the visible effects of fire and movement in applications inappropriate for or hostile to other detection methods.
UK fire alarm system categories
There are many types of fire alarm systems each suited to different building types and applications. A fire alarm system can vary dramatically in both price and complexity, from a single panel with a detector and sounder in a small commercial property to an addressable fire alarm system in a multi-occupancy building. Systems have to protect both buildings and occupants.

The categories of fire alarm systems are L if they are designed to protect life, P to protect buildings and M if they are manual systems.

M Manual systems, e.g. hand bells, gongs, etc. These may be purely manual or manual electric, the latter may have call points and sounders. They rely on the occupants of the building discovering the fire and acting to warn others by operating the system. Such systems form the basic requirement for places of employment with no sleeping risk.
P1 The system is installed throughout the building – the objective being to call the fire brigade as early as possible to ensure that any damage caused by fire is minimized. Small low risk areas can be excepted, such as toilets and cupboards less than 1m².
P2 Detection should be provided in parts of the building where the risk of ignition is high and/or the contents are particularly valuable. Category 2 systems provide fire detection in specified parts of the building where there is either high risk or where business disruption must be minimised.
L1 A category L1 system is designed for the protection of life and which has automatic detectors installed throughout all areas of the building (including roof spaces and voids) with the aim of providing the earliest possible warning. A category L1 system is likely to be appropriate for the majority of residential care premises. In practice, detectors should be placed in nearly all spaces and voids. With category 1 systems, the whole of a building is covered apart from minor exceptions.
L2 A category L2 system designed for the protection of life and which has automatic detectors installed in escape routes, rooms adjoining escape routes and high hazard rooms. In a medium sized premises (sleeping no more than ten residents), a category L2 system is ideal. These fire alarm systems are identical to an L3 system but with additional detection in an area where there is a high chance of ignition, e.g., kitchen) or where the risk to people is particularly increased (e.g., sleeping risk).
L3 This category is designed to give early warning to everyone. Detectors should be placed in all escape routes and all rooms that open onto escape routes. Category 3 systems provide more extensive cover than category 4. The objective is to warn the occupants of the building early enough to ensure that all are able to exit the building before escape routes become impassable.
L4 Category 4 systems cover escape routes and circulation areas only. Therefore, detectors will be placed in escape routes, although this may not be suitable depending on the risk assessment or if the size and complexity of a building is increased. Detectors might be sited in other areas of the building, but the objective is to protect the escape route.
L5 This is the “all other situations” category, e.g., computer rooms, which may be protected with an extinguishing system triggered by automatic detection. Category 5 systems are the “custom” category and relate to some special requirement that cannot be covered by any other category.